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May 31, 2022

EBRD climate chief addresses the difficulty in moving away from gas

By Burhan Khadbai
BRIGHTON, UNITED KINGDOM – SEPTEMBER 24: The disused framework of the storage tank at a former gasworks is seen on September 24, 2021 in Brighton, United Kingdom. Rising prices of natural gas in the UK have pushed several energy suppliers out of business this year, with other industries warning of knock-on effects, such as the production of carbon dioxide, which is widely used by the food and drink industry. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
BRIGHTON, UNITED KINGDOM – SEPTEMBER 24: The disused framework of the storage tank at a former gasworks is seen on September 24, 2021 in Brighton, United Kingdom. Rising prices of natural gas in the UK have pushed several energy suppliers out of business this year, with other industries warning of knock-on effects, such as the production of carbon dioxide, which is widely used by the food and drink industry. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)

Harry Boyd-Carpenter, managing director, green economy and climate action at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, speaks about the bank’s climate strategy.

Earlier this month, the EBRD hosted its 2022 Annual Meeting and Business Forum in Marrakech, Morocco. In an interview at that event, Mr Boyd-Carpenter spoke about what it classifies as green investments, the role of gas and the impact of the war in Ukraine on energy transition.

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