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August 18, 2022

Schrödinger’s cat and sustainability

People search a card index at the newly opened National Library in Bucharest on April 23, 2012. The official opening was on April 23, when librarians celebrate Romania’s National Day of Librarian. Initially the public will have access to seven of the 14 reading rooms and multipurpose rooms. Opened in an refurbished communist era building, the National Library of Romania has a fstock of more than 12 million volumes. AFP PHOTO / DANIEL MIHAILESCU        (Photo credit should read DANIEL MIHAILESCU/AFP/GettyImages)
People search a card index at the newly opened National Library in Bucharest on April 23, 2012. The official opening was on April 23, when librarians celebrate Romania’s National Day of Librarian. Initially the public will have access to seven of the 14 reading rooms and multipurpose rooms. Opened in an refurbished communist era building, the National Library of Romania has a fstock of more than 12 million volumes. AFP PHOTO / DANIEL MIHAILESCU (Photo credit should read DANIEL MIHAILESCU/AFP/GettyImages)

After analysing holdings of all US-domiciled equities funds, Util, an analytics company that uses machine learning, has concluded that there is “no such thing as a ‘sustainable investment’.”

It studied funds’ contribution to achieving each of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals by processing 120 million ‘peer-reviewed’ texts to establish relationships between investment products and the SDGs.

Well, wrote Util CEO Patrick Wood Uribe: “In a complex global economy, there are few obvious, absolute ‘good’ or ‘bad’ investments. Inevitable tradeoffs exist in every value chain, the implications of which change depending on the social, environmental, or economic goal in question.”

Worth a read to see which funds are contributing the most to each of the SDGs – and which are having the worst negative impact on them.

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A service from the Financial Times